The First Battle of Brandy Station

This Sunday, attendees of the Fourth Annual Emerging Civil War Symposium at Stevenson Ridge will tour the battlefield of Brandy Station. This area in eastern Culpeper County was some of the most fought over during the Civil War. While the largest and most important of the engagements, fought on June 9, 1863, will be explored, […]

via “On Came the Johnnies”: The First Battle of Brandy Station — Emerging Civil War

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Stones River Battlefield

This year, I have visited Vicksburg, Carter House (Battle of Franklin) and paid more attention to the Cowan line during the Tullahoma Campaign which happened during the the same time as Vicksburg and Gettysburg and therefore gets overshadowed and up until about 20 years ago almost ignored. We grew up hearing about Bull Run, Antietam, Sherman’s March to the Sea and Grant vs. Lee.

The Stones River Battle which occurred at the end of 1862 near Murfreesboro, Tennessee also is rarely mentioned in national accounts on the Civil War. This despite being the Union Victory that enabled Abraham Lincoln to issue the Enamancipation Proclamation. Keep in mind, 1862 had mostly been a disaster for the North in the East and would continue until Gettysburg. The North did better in Tennessee, but still a long ways to go.

The Stones River battle involved around 81,000 soldiers and ended up with 24,000 casualties making it in the top ten of costliest battles. It was nice to get an overview of the battle where it involved the main Union line just west of the railroad that ran from Nashville to Chattanooga. This area involved 30,000 soldiers, hundred of horses and several artillery pieces. Of an original 4,000 acres that the battle involved, this part was about 50 acres out of approximately 650 acres preserved.

We then toured part of the cemetery which was established after the battle.

 

 

 

 

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The World Doesn’t Need Another Ansel Adams

In Flow with Otto

«Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.» – Oscar Wilde

We all have our heroes. We all have our role models. Be it in arts or in other aspects of life. And that is all fine. The hardest part, though, is to break ties with those heroes. Particularly in arts. To find our own voice takes courage and determination. It takes consciousness and willingness to do those first stumbling steps on our own. Finding your own voice may take some time to develop. But there is no way around it if your want to become true to your own vocation, if you want to become a true artist. It’s just like the child breaking ties with its parents to become a grown-up himself – or herself.

As artists we have all copied others at some point in our creative training. That’s but natural. We learn by copying. One of the…

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A Camera Will Open the World

In Flow with Otto

Summer is a time for taking time off, for breaking up from usual routines, for travel, for relaxation, for exploring waters or mountains, for good food, for spending time with friends and families. The last two weeks I have enjoyed all this. And off course photographed all while enjoying my summer holidays. The camera is always with me, even when I take time off from working as a photographer.

Summer is high season for photography for most people. It’s also a time when we photograph more freely and use the camera not only to record our dear ones but the world around us as we go travelling to new places. The camera becomes a tool to connect to the world. And it becomes a tool to connect with people. If we only dare.

Photographing people we meet on the street takes courage, persistence and not the least being willing to…

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Falls Mill Picture

Read my original blog post at Return Visit To Falls Mill

I have this print of Falls Mill for sale. You can buy your own frame, but generally a wood frame works best.  I bought this one at A.C. Moore.  I will be posting an updated version soon for $30.

Msg me or email me at chrisgfortner@hotmail.com with subject heading “Falls Mill Picture” if you are interested in details. Otherwise, unfamiliar email addresses will go into spam box and I won’t recognize that you emailed about the picture. FallsMill